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GPU
Technology
Conference

March 24-27, 2014 | San Jose, California
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TALK

Presentation
Details

S4171 - Efficient GPU-Friendly Pre-Conditioners for Large-Scale Finite Element Analysis

Krishnan Suresh ( Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin )
Krishnan Suresh
Krishnan Suresh is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison. He graduated in 1998 from Cornell with a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering. He later served as an Engineering Manager at Kulicke and Soffa Industries (1998-2002). His research interests are in optimization, high-performance computing and He has co-authored over 35 journal papers, and several conference papers, two of which have received best-paper awards from ASME

The goal of this session is to introduce a new GPU-friendly pre-conditioner, specifically for finite-element applications. The pre-conditioner is assembly-free in that neither the finite-element stiffness matrix nor the pre-conditioner is assembled (ever!). The memory foot-print is therefore extremely small, and the GPU implementation is, in most cases, compute-bound. A CUDA implementation will be discussed, followed by examples of finite element problems with 10's of millions of degrees of freedom. It is assumed that registrants are already familiar with finite element techniques.

Session Level: Intermediate
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Numerical Algorithms & Libraries; Computational Structural Mechanics; Computer Aided Design

Day: Tuesday, 03/25
Time: 13:00 - 13:25
Location: Room LL21D

S4333 - Computing the Cure: Combining Sequencing and Physical Simulation on GPUs to Provide Patient Customized Cancer Treatments

Ross Walker ( Associate Professor, UCSD )
Ross Walker
Ross Walker is an Associate Research Professor at the San Diego Supercomputer Center, an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California, San Diego, CEO of Verizyme Inc and an NVIDIA Fellow. He runs the Walker Molecular Dynamics Lab in San Diego where he leads a team that develops advanced techniques for Molecular Dynamics Simulations supporting work aimed at improved drug and biocatalyst design. His work includes improved Quantum Mechanical, Molecular Mechanical models, development of new force fields for simulation of lipid membranes, simulations of cellulase enzymes for improved cellulosic bioethanol production and the development of a GPU accelerated version of the AMBER Molecular Dynamics engine PMEMD.

The sequencing revolution is completely changing the landscape of cancer treatment ushering in the era of personalized medicine where individual treatments will be customized for a specific patient. Instead of simply looking at stained tumor biopsy sections under a microscope, cancer diagnosis is going high-tech by allowing sequencing of patient tumors (and patient genomes) to determine what precise molecular events cause an individual cancer. In principle, this sequence information holds the key to individually targeted therapies with enormously increased success rates in treating (and even curing) cancer. This is the "molecular oncology" revolution and it will completely change the cancer diagnosis and treatment landscape in the next decade. This talk will highlight work by scientists at MSKCC, Stanford and UCSD to build the tools needed to determine drug susceptibilities using a combination of sequencing data and *physical* simulation. This work will ultimately provide a way to compute patient customized cancer treatments.

Session Level: Intermediate
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Molecular Dynamics; Computational Structural Mechanics; Bioinformatics & Genomics; Computational Physics; Recommended for All Press

Day: Wednesday, 03/26
Time: 10:00 - 10:50
Location: Room LL21E

S4201 - GPU Acceleration of Sparse Matrix Factorization in CHOLMOD

Steven Rennich ( Senior HPC Developer Technology Engineer, NVIDIA )
Highly-Rated Speaker
Steven Rennich
Steven Rennich is a Sr. NVIDIA HPC Developer Technology Engineer. His primary activities include promoting the use of GPUs in computational structural mechanics and the development and optimization of parallel algorithms for direct and iterative solvers for sparse linear systems. Steve holds a Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from Stanford University where his research involved computational fluid mechanics and vortex system instabilities. Prior to joining Nvidia, Steve spent many years parallelizing structural analysis and rigid body dynamics codes.
Tim Davis ( Professor, University of Florida )
Tim Davis
Tim Davis is a professor in Computer and Information Science and Engineering at the University of Florida. He is a Fellow of the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), in recognition for his work on sparse matrix algorithms. His software for sparse direct methods appears in 100s of applications in industry, academia, and government labs, including MATLAB (x=A), Mathematica, NASTRAN, Cadence, Mentor Graphics, Google Ceres (StreetView, PhotoTours), IBM, Berkeley Design Automation, Xyce, and many others. For a full CV, see http://www.cise.ufl.edu/~davis/background.html .

Sparse direct solvers, and their requisite factorization step, are a critical component of computational engineering and science codes. High performance is typically achieved by reducing the sparse problem to dense sub-problems and applying dense math kernels. However, achieving high performance on a GPU is complicated due to the range of sizes of the dense sub-problems, irregular memory access patterns, and the limited communication bandwidth between the host system and the GPU. This talk will describe the high factorization performance achieved in CHOLMOD using the GPU and discuss in detail key techniques used to achieve this performance including minimizing communication and maximizing concurrency.

Session Level: Intermediate
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Numerical Algorithms & Libraries; Big Data Analytics & Data Algorithms; Computational Structural Mechanics

Day: Wednesday, 03/26
Time: 14:00 - 14:50
Location: Room LL20D

S4669 - Supercharging Engineering Simulations at Mercury Marine with NVIDIA GPUs

Arden Anderson ( Technical Specialist - Computational Analysis, Mercury Marine )
Arden Anderson
Arden Anderson is responsible for structural analysis, crashworthiness, and vessel performance simulations at Mercury Marine. He also determines computing hardware requirements and has helped Mercury Marine transition to High Performance Computing (HPC). Prior to joining Mercury Marine in 2005, Mr. Anderson spent three years as an Engineering Analyst at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory simulating blast loading and hypervelocity impact. At LLNL he was exposed to world class HPC environments, including the fastest computer in the world at that time (BlueGene/L). Mr. Anderson holds a BS and MS in Engineering Mechanics from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

Mercury Marine will discuss their recent evaluation of NVIDIA GPU's for accelerating performance for Abaqus FEA. As part of the talk, Arden will highlight the critical metrics for the evaluation, and how they chose between having the GPU's at the local desktop or installed in the back room cluster. Arden will also discuss the business impact for the company from using a GPU-accelerated FEA implementation. Lastly, Arden will discuss what Mercury sees as future potential for leveraging GPU's as part of their design workflow.

Session Level: All
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Digital Manufacturing Summit; Computational Structural Mechanics; Clusters & GPU Management; Computational Fluid Dynamics

Day: Wednesday, 03/26
Time: 15:30 - 15:55
Location: Room 210H

S4449 - Product Innovation Using Private & Public Cloud

Ravi Kunju ( VP of Strategy and Business, Altair )
Ravi Kunju: Over 20 years of experience in applying advance numerical methods and analytics, specifically in HPC, to solve complex problems in the areas of CAE and BI. Ravi's career has spanned working at Ford and Chrysler in the areas of crash-safety, advanced manufacturing (sheet metal forming), and at Altair in product design, software product management, and executive roles in global sales, regional management, and strategic marketing. Ravi has a M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Wayne State University, and an MBA from Ross School of Business, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Simulation driven product innovation leads to a lot of design explorations that traditionally require significant investment in computing infrastructure. Cloud based solutions have promising potential in becoming a channel for such massive computations, however the biggest challenge is to address the visualization of the 'big-data', generated from these large computation. A software and hardware engineered appliance targeted in providing a unified interface for the entire Product Simulation Lifecycle will be demonstrated with examples, as the framework for the Altair's private and public cloud offerings.

Session Level: All
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Graphics Virtualization Summit; Computational Structural Mechanics; Digital Product Design & Styling; Digital Manufacturing Summit

Day: Wednesday, 03/26
Time: 16:00 - 16:25
Location: Room 210F

S4497 - Parallelizing a Real-Time 3D Finite Element Algorithm using CUDA: Limitations, Challenges and Opportunities

Vukasin Strbac ( PhD student, KULeuven University, Leuven )
Vukasin Strbac is a PhD student at KULeuven University, Leuven, Belgium. He is a member of the Biomechanics section, within the Department of Mechanical Engineering. He is also a member of the Robotics Assisted Surgery group specializing in the Finite Element Method and parallel computing for the intraoperative setting.

Learn about the challenges of parallelizing a Finite Element problem using the Total Lagrangian Explicit Dynamic formulation. We examine the algorithm and perform a detailed analysis of the performance limiting factors of parallelization using CUDA. Potential optimization benefits are elucidated in terms of register usage thresholds and other factors for better performance. Results of a larger usability study are presented on a simple problem examining single/double precision tradeoff on a wide range of GPUs and problem sizes. Discover the impact that real-time FE can bring to the intraoperative surgical setting with in-the-loop computation facilitating surgical robotics.

Session Level: Intermediate
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Numerical Algorithms & Libraries; Computational Structural Mechanics; Computational Physics

Day: Wednesday, 03/26
Time: 16:30 - 16:55
Location: Room LL20D

S4593 - Chrono::Flex – A Flexible Multibody Dynamics Framework on the GPU

Daniel Melanz ( Research Assistant, University of Wisconsin - Madison )
Daniel Melanz
Daniel has a Master's Degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin - Madison. His technical area of focus is modeling and simulation using high-performance computing with an emphasis on terramechanics and multiphysics. He is currently working toward his PhD in Mechanical Engineering with a minor in Computer Science.

In this work, we investigate the performance gains that the Spike::GPU methodology offers over alternative solutions based on using other linear solvers, such as Pardiso. We present results for problems of sizes that are relevant in engineering applications; for example, a net simulation composed of approximately one million beam elements.

Session Level: Intermediate
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Numerical Algorithms & Libraries; Computational Physics; Computational Structural Mechanics; Combined Simulation & Real-Time Visualization

Day: Wednesday, 03/26
Time: 17:00 - 17:25
Location: Room LL20D

S4762 - Simulation Really Does Imitate Life: Modeling a Human Heart Valve and other FSI Applications with GPU Technology

Wayne Mindle ( Director of Sales & Marketing, CertaSIM, LLC )
Dr. Mindle is currently the Director of Sales & Marketing at CertaSIM, LLC, the US and Canadian distributor of the IMPETUS Afea Solver. In addition he is the Benchmark Manager for IMEPTUS Afea. He obtained his Ph.D. from Northwestern University, in the area of Applied Mechanics, more specifically Finite Element Analysis as applied to the area of Nonlinear Explicit Transient Dynamic Problems. He has worked for several major aerospace companies, a consulting company for the FAA and prior to his association with CertaSIM, spent 15 years at LSTC as the lead technical sales engineer.

Fluid Structure interaction is one of the most challenging areas for numerical simulations. By itself modeling Fluid flow is complicated enough but to add the interaction with a deformable structure makes it even more challenging. One particular theory, SPH, is especially suited for GPU processing. SPH stands for Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics and it is a particle based Lagrangian continuum method which can run completely on the GPU. Improvements in the classic SPH Solver has led to an extremely accurate and robust solver that can better capture the pressure field for violent water impacts. FSI means fluid structure interaction and so to solve complicated problems an equally robust and accurate finite element solver needs to be part of the coupled solution. One particular application is modelling a Real Human Heart Valve, something that has not been done until now. Results using the latest NVIDIA GPU, the K40, will be shown for Heart Valve model along with other FSI applications.

Session Level: Intermediate
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Computational Fluid Dynamics; Computational Structural Mechanics

Day: Thursday, 03/27
Time: 10:00 - 10:25
Location: Room LL20B

S4255 - Efficient Particle-Based Simulation of Dynamic Cracks and Fractures in Ceramic Material

Patrick Diehl ( Ph.D. Candidate, University of Bonn )
Patrick Diehl
Patrick is a Scientific Assistant and Ph.D. Candidate at the Institute for Numerical Simulation at the University of Bonn where he also participates in the NVIDIA CUDA Research Center. From 2012 to 2013, Patrick was a Scientific Assistant and Ph.D. Candidate at the Institute Simulation of Large Systems at the University of Stuttgart. Patrick graduated in 2012 with a Diploma in Computer Science from the University of Stuttgart.

Nowadays, ceramic is often used in the automotive or aeronautics industries, but the simulation of dynamic cracks and fractures in these materials is difficult, because of bifurcations at the crack tips. In this session we present the benefits of GPU's to simulate dynamic crack and fractures in solids, e. g. ceramic materials, using the Peridynamic technique. (1) Most discrete equations of particle-based methods depend on finding neighborhoods. Therefore we present our novel library to find the k-nearest neighbors efficient on the GPU's. (2) Using the high parallelism of the GPU allows increasing the amount of particles, which influence the dependability of the simulation. To validate our implementation on the GPU we simulate a common high-velocity impact scenario and compare our results with experimental data.

Session Level: Intermediate
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Computational Structural Mechanics; Visual Effects & Simulation; Digital Manufacturing Summit

Day: Thursday, 03/27
Time: 15:00 - 15:25
Location: Room LL21B

Talk
 

HANDS-ON LAB

Presentation
Details

S4792 - Hands-on Lab: Leveraging Accelerated Core Agorithms Using NVIDIA AmgX

Marat Arsaev ( Systems Software Engineer, NVIDIA )
Marat's expertise include image & video processing and software optimization and acceleration using GPUs. Prior to joining NVIDIA, Marat was a Software Developer at MSU Graphics & Media Lab.Marat received his degree in Computer Science from Moscow State University.

AMGX is a new flexible and easy-to-use NVIDIA GPU-accelerated high performance sparse linear solver library. It features variety of popular solvers as well as user-defined solver configurations like nested solvers or preconditioners. Come and learn how easy is it to use the library in your application, configure the solver and get maximum performance of it. You will also learn how to solve your linear system using multiple GPUs using our library. Be prepared for this hands-on lab by installing the suggested software at bit.ly/gtc14labs on your system.

Session Level: Intermediate
Session Type: Hands-on Lab
Tags: Computational Structural Mechanics; Computational Fluid Dynamics; Computational Physics; Programming Languages & Compilers

Day: Wednesday, 03/26
Time: 15:30 - 16:50
Location: Room 230A

Hands-on lab