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GPU
Technology
Conference

March 24-27, 2014 | San Jose, California
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TALK

Presentation
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S4719 - Delivering Performance in Scientific Simulations: Present and Future Role of GPUs in Supercomputing

Thomas Schulthess ( Professor of Computational Physics, ETH Zurich / CSCS )
Thomas Schulthess
Thomas Schulthess received his Ph.D. in physics from ETH Zurich in 1994. He is a professor for computational physics at ETH Zurich and Director of the Swiss National Supercomputing Center in Lugano, Switzerland. Thomas holds a visiting distinguished professor appointment at ORNL, where he was group leader and researcher in computational materials science for over a decade before moving to ETH Zurich in 2008. His current research interests are in development of efficient and scalable algorithms for the study of strongly correlated quantum systems, as well as electronic structure methods in general. He is also engaged in the development of efficient tools and simulations systems for other domain areas, such as meteorology/climate and geophysics.

GPU-based supercomputers are the most energy efficient and among the most powerful computing systems in use today. We show with examples from computational physics and climate simulations how this performance is delivered today to solve real-world problems. You will see how application software can has been structured in order to port seamlessly across hardware platforms, what aspects of current hybrid CPU-GPU platforms matter, and how such architectures should best develop, so that applications continue to benefit from exponential performance increases in the future.

Session Level: All
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Climate, Weather, Ocean Modeling; Supercomputing; Computational Physics; Numerical Algorithms & Libraries; Recommended Press Session – HPC-Science

Day: Thursday, 03/27
Time: 09:00 - 09:25
Location: Room 212B

S4157 - Development, Parallelization and Performance of the NIM Next-Generation Weather Model on Titan

Mark Govett ( Chief, Advanced Computing Section, NOAA )
Highly-Rated Speaker
Mark Govett
Mark manages the Advanced Computing Section, a software group that supports model development, parallelization, and porting to high performance computers, and explores advanced computing technologies for NOAA. Mark has a background in high-performance computing, code parallelization and compiler development and diverse interests in high performance computing. He developed two directive-based Fortran compilers: the Scalable Modeling System for MPI based, distributed-memory parallelization, and the F2C-ACC compiler for GPU parallelization. Mark received his Bachelors of Science, Computer Science, University of Colorado, Denver, 1991 and his Masters of Science, Computer Science, University of Colorado, Boulder, 1995.

The Non-hydrostatic Icosahedral Model (NIM) is a next-generation global weather model being developed at NOAA to improve 0-100 day weather predictions. Since development began in 2008, the model has been designed to run on highly parallel computer architectures such as GPUs. GPU parallelization has relied on the directive-based Fortran-to-CUDA ACCelerator (F2C-ACC) compiler developed at NOAA. Recent work has focused on parallelization of model physics, evaluating the openACC compilers, and preparing the model to run at the full 3.5KM resolution on 5000 nodes of Titan. This talk will report on the development of the NIM model, describe our efforts to improve parallel performance on Titan, and report on our experiences using the openACC compilers.

Session Level: All
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Climate, Weather, Ocean Modeling

Day: Thursday, 03/27
Time: 09:30 - 09:55
Location: Room 212B

S4565 - Weather Prediction Code Witten by a High-productivity Framework for Multi-GPU Computing

Takashi Shimokawabe ( Assistant Professor, Tokyo Institute of Technology )
Takashi Shimokawabe
Takashi Shimokawabe is currently an assistant professor at the Global Scientific Information and Computing Center (GSIC), Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech). I am a member of the Aoki laboratory in GSIC. My primary research interests are general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU), computational fluid dynamics, and high performance computing. Our group was awarded the 2011 Gordon Bell Prize Special Achievements in Scalability and Time-to-Solution for peta-scale phase-field simulations (T. Shimokawabe et al.) I received Ph.D. in Energy Science from Tokyo Tech in 2012. I graduated with M.S. in Physics from Tokyo Tech in 2007.

Numerical weather prediction is one of the major applications in high-performance computing and is accelerated on GPU supercomputers. Obtaining good parallel efficiency using more than thousand GPUs often requires skillful programming, for example, both MPI for the inter-node communication and NVIDIA GPUDirect for the intra-node communication. The Japan Meteorological Agency is developing a next-generation high-resolution meso-scale weather prediction code ASUCA. We are implementing it on a multi-GPU platform by using a high-productivity framework for mesh-based application. Our framework automatically translates user-written functions that update a grid point and generates both GPU and CPU codes. The framework can also hide the complicated implementation for the efficient communications described above. In this presentation, we will show the implementation of the weather prediction code by using this framework and the performance evaluation on the TSUBAME 2.5 supercomputer at Tokyo Institute of Technology.

Session Level: Intermediate
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Climate, Weather, Ocean Modeling; Computational Fluid Dynamics; Supercomputing; Recommended Press Session – HPC-Science

Day: Thursday, 03/27
Time: 10:00 - 10:25
Location: Room 212B

S4352 - ASUCA on GPU: Uncompromising Hybrid Port for Physical Core of Japanese Weather Model

Michel Müller ( MSc ETH in Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science )
Graduated from ETH Zurich in 2012 as Master of Science in Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Michel's Master thesis was written as guest at the Gordon Bell price winning Aoki Laboratory at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. He successfully migrated Japan's next generation weather prediction model (ASUCA) to Hybrid Fortran in a three month project at the renowned RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, home of one of the world's fastest super computers. Mr. Müller presented at the GPU Technology Conference 2013 hosted by NVIDIA in San Jose, California and has four years of experience as a Software Engineer at ATEGRA AG Switzerland.

ASUCA is the next generation non-hydrostatic Japanese mesoscale weather prediction model, currently developed at the Japan Meteorological Agency. In order to join the successful GPU port of its Dynamical Core by Shimokawabe et al., the Physical Core has now been fully ported as well. In order to achieve a unified codebase with high usability as well as high performance on both GPU and CPU, a new directive based Open Source language extension called 'Hybrid Fortran' has been used (as introduced at GTC 2013). Using a python-based preprocessor it automatically creates CUDA Fortran code for GPU and OpenMP Fortran code for CPU - with two separate horizontal loop orders in order to keep performance. Attendees of this session will learn how to create a hybrid codebase with high usability as well as high performance on both CPU and GPU, how we used a preprocessor to achieve our goals and, how to use Macros for Memory optimizations while following the DRY principle.

Session Level: Intermediate
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Climate, Weather, Ocean Modeling

Day: Thursday, 03/27
Time: 14:00 - 14:25
Location: Room 212B

S4312 - QUIC EnvSim: Radiative Heat Transfer in Vegetative and Urban Environments with NVIDIA OptiX

Matthew Overby ( Graduate Research Assistant, University of Minnesota Duluth )
Matthew Overby
Matthew Overby is a graduate research assistant at the University of Minnesota Duluth. He is a member of the GEnUSiS Project (http://envsim.d.umn.edu/), whose goal is to build tools for designing more efficient urban infrastructure.

This session presents QUIC EnvSim, a scientific tool for modeling the complex interactions between the environment and urban form. The talk will focus on the simulation of radiative heat transfer in urban environments with vegetation (such as trees, parks, or green rooftops) using the GPU accelerated NVIDIA OptiX ray tracing engine. Attend this session to learn how we utilize OptiX to efficiently and accurately simulate radiative transport in urban domains. Topics include: (1) The physical properties of surfaces and vegetation and how they interact with longwave and shortwave radiation; (2) Efficient and scalable discretization of large urban domains; (3) Strategies we employed for overcoming challenges such as atomic operations, multiple GPUs, and more; and (4) Results that illustrate the validity, efficiency, and scalability of the system.

Session Level: Beginner
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Climate, Weather, Ocean Modeling; Ray Tracing

Day: Thursday, 03/27
Time: 14:30 - 14:55
Location: Room 212B

S4682 - Developing a System For Real-Time Numerical Simulation During Physical Experiments in a Wave Propagation Laboratory

Darren Schmidt ( Numerical Computing Specialist, National Instruments )
Darren Schmidt
Darren Schmidt has worked for National Instruments in Austin, TX for almost two decades serving as a computation expert on a wide array of products and authoring several patents across multiple computational math domains. Currently, he works in NI's Scientific Research and Lead User Group defining, developing and deploying cutting edge systems for big analog data and large physics applications. These real-world applications demand use of a broad range of (co-)processor technologies in time-constrained situations for which he has amassed a great deal of intuition and experience.

ETH-Zurich is proposing a new concept for wave propagation laboratories in which the physical experiment is linked with a numerical simulation in real time. Adding live experimental data to a larger numerical simulation domain creates a virtual lab environment never before realized and enabling the study of frequencies inherent in important seismological and acoustic real-world scenarios. The resulting environment is made possible by a real-time computing system under development. This system must perform computations typically reserved for traditional (offline) HPC applications but produce results in a matter of microseconds. To do so, National Instruments is using the LabVIEW platform to leverage NI's fastest data acquisition and FPGA hardware with NVIDIA's most powerful GPU processors to build a real-time heterogenous simulator.

Session Level: Intermediate
Session Type: Talk
Tags: Climate, Weather, Ocean Modeling; Big Data Analytics & Data Algorithms; Signal & Audio Processing; Numerical Algorithms & Libraries

Day: Thursday, 03/27
Time: 15:00 - 15:25
Location: Room 212B

Talk